5 of the Most Valuable Lost Treasures That Haven’t Been Found

If it’s easy money you’re looking for, then maybe it’s time to dust off your Indiana Jones garb from your closet and head out for a treasure hunt. You never know, you might just be the one to discover one of these valuable lost treasures.

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Heirloom Seal of the Realm

The Heirloom Seal of the Realm has always been one of the most coveted and most valuable lost treasures in history. The seal was carved from the world’s most precious and polished jade stone, then handed from an emperor to another, throughout five dynasties and ten kingdoms, from 907 through 960 AD.

Unfortunately, the rare seal got lost, and it wasn’t until the Ming Dynasty that the public knew about it. Thereafter, numerous seals were well crafted for the emperors, yet nothing seems to surmount the value of the original seal; no wonder so many people pretentiously claim to have found it. However, the Imperial Seal of China, its alternative name, remains untracked.

Heirloom Seal of the Realm

Crown Jewels of the United Kingdom

The regalia of monarchs are important historical pieces to the British, which is why they’re housed in a secure place. However, experts say that the 140 crown jewels sitting in the Tower of London aren’t all original; some are new jewels that are mere replica of King John’s royal insignia.

In 1216, the King fled England and took with him some of his crowns, scepters, and various pieces of jewelry. He suddenly fell ill and decided to return promptly, but the tides were too strong then. His assistants had to prioritize him over the regalia. The baggage containing his crown jewel was lost en route and was never found.

Crown Jewels of the United Kingdom

Scepter of Dagobert

Another monarch regalia lost in history, the Scepter of Dagobert is the oldest of the French Crown Jewels. The scepter was 56 centimeters in length and was conserved at the Basilica of Saint-Dennis, also known as the Basilique royale de Saint-Dennis.

However, the scepter disappeared and was presumed stolen from the church in 1975. Since then, Dagobert’s scepter has been the subject of several treasure hunts.

Scepter of Dagobert

Florentine Diamond

Florentine Diamond was once a in the possession of Ferdinando II de Medici, the Grand Duke of Tuscany, in 1657. The light-yellow diamond was later passed onto different hands of the Medici lineage. Soon after the fall of the Austrian Empire during World War I, the high-priced stone was taken by Charles I of Austria as he escaped to Switzerland.

Florentine Diamond

Historians claim that the Florentine already cost $750,000 when the Medici lineage had it. So it didn’t really come as a surprise when a close friend of the Imperial family stole the diamond.

Although there are no solid proofs as to where the Florentine is, scholars speculate that the stone was recut, sold, and taken to the United States.

Florentine Diamond

Menorah

A seven-lamp Israeli lamp stand, Menorah is made of pure gold and was once used in the mobile altar of Moses, as narrated in the Book of Exodus. Since then, the item has become the religious symbol of Judaism and the emblem of modern-day Israel’s heraldic bearing.

However, no one has ever seen the 2000-year-old Menorah; the lost piece of treasure‘s location remains a mystery to archaeologists, who only rely on ancient carvings as indications of its existence.

Menorah

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